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The Quiet Revolution of Caroline Herschel

Emily Winterburn and Sian Prosser

7-8pm, Sat 20 Nov, 2021

Live talk on Zoom

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/2ZXIxkS

**The correct link to this event was emailed to ticket holders on Sat 20/11/2021 from Katherine Gwyn, please email katherine.gwyn@buckinghamshire.gov.uk if you have not received the email**

Caroline Lucretia Herschel (1750-1848), was the sister of the astronomer William Herschel. She worked with him in their homes in Datchet and Slough, and carried out important astronomical work in her own right, eventually earning the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society as recognition for her contributions to the field.

In this talk, Dr Emily Winterburn, author of The Quiet Revolution of Caroline Herschel, will talk about this astronomer’s life and achievements. Dr Sian Prosser, librarian and archivist of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), will share key documents from Caroline Herschel’s working papers held in the RAS archives.

Sian manages the library and archives of the Royal Astronomical Society, making them accessible to researchers and working with colleagues to use them in outreach and education activities.

With a background in languages and a PhD in French medieval manuscripts, she became drawn to working with memory institutions, and since joining the Royal Astronomical Society in 2014 has completed the Certificate in Astronomy at UCL to better understand and interpret the RAS collections, and the people that created them.  

http://ras.ac.uk/library

Emily Winterburn is currently a primary school teacher in inner-city Leeds; however, she is also an expert on the Herschel family and women within the history of science more broadly. She is the author of The Quiet Revolution of Caroline Herschel as well as several other books on the history of astronomy.

Emily was curator of astronomy at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich for 10 years, before moving to Leeds to work first as a curator at the Leeds History of Science Museum (part of the University of Leeds) and then as a teacher. She completed her PhD on the Herschel family in 2011, out of which came her book on Caroline, several academic articles and chapters in larger volumes.

She is currently working on her contributions to a book on Women in Science; to a new volume on the life of John Herschel and is in the beginning stages of editing one volume in a series for academics and teachers to support work on gender and colonialism in science.

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Sensible Footwear: why LGBTQ+ Histories matter

Kate Charlesworth in conversation with Sue Shave

7pm, Tue 23 Nov, 2021

Live talk via Zoom, book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3bjVFCX

The link to join this event was emailed to ticket holders from katherine.gwyn@buckinghamshire.gov.uk on 23 Nov 2021

In the wake of Kate’s 2019 graphic memoir, cum LGBT+ history of the UK from the 1950s: Sensible Footwear, a Girl’s Guide, the illustrator and cartoonist talks to Sue Shave, Director of Discover Bucks Museum, about the importance of telling queer histories.

Kate is a cartoonist and illustrator living and working in Edinburgh, though originally from Barnsley, South Yorkshire. 

Her work has appeared in newspapers, magazines, books, indie comics, exhibitions and electronic media – she’s drawn storyboards for Hot Animation and Aardman Animations; in 2014, ‘Sally Heathcote: Suffragette’ was published by Cape, which she worked on in joint collaboration with Mary and Bryan Talbot.

Kate’s graphic memoir / LGBT+ history of the UK from 1950 (emphasis on the ‘L’) to the 2019, Sensible Footwear, a Girl’s Guide was published by Myriad Editions, 2019.

Sue Shave has been working in the museum and heritage sector for over 30 years, with the last 18 years as a Museum Director of Cold Harbour Mill in Devon, then Chiltern Open Air Museum in Bucks and currently Discover Bucks Museum, formerly known as Bucks County Museum. She is a member of Bucks Pride organising committee and has organised several PRIDE events in local museums including Chiltern Open Air Museum and Bucks County Museum with support from local LGBTQ meet up groups.

Sue was invited onto the LGBTQ National Lottery Heritage Fund LGBTQ advisory group in 2018 to help the funder shape funding for LGBTQ people and heritage in the future. She would like to think of herself as the most famous lesbian in Aylesbury – but its probably not true! But she has featured on Wycombe Sound and BBC 3 Counties radio talking about Discover Bucks Museum’s growing collection of LGBTQ collections that represent our local LGBTQ audiences to finally ensure representation of LGBTQ people in Discover Bucks Museum’s new galleries when they open in the new year.

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Stowe House & Huntington Library – Transatlantic Link-Up!

Rosemary O’Day; Vanessa Wilkie; Anna McEvoy

7pm, Sat 6 Nov, 2021

Live talk via Zoom; SOLD OUT

Stowe House and its Archive parted ways in the early 20th century, with the papers, tracking hundreds of years of the estate’s history, and the stories of the people living there, becoming part of the collection of the Huntington Library in California.

Tonight, via the power of Zoom, we pull together three experts: Anna McEvoy, of Stowe House Preservation Trust; Dr Vanessa Wilkie, curator of the Stowe Papers at the Huntington Library, and Professor Rosemary O’Day, an academic who has researched the Temple family and its lifestyle prior to 1697 via the Temple Family Papers at the Huntington Library. We promise you a unique event.

Anna will take us on a tour through the state rooms of Stowe House looking at the restoration that has been accomplished over the last 20 years, and how research at the Huntington Library has allowed Stowe House Preservation Trust to achieve this.

Dr. Wilkie will tell the story of how this collection came to California, share highlights and stories from the archive, and explain how diverse researchers use the materials today.

Rosemary O’Day (aka Rosemary Englander) is Emeritus Professor of History at The Open University. She taught there for over forty years. Rosemary has written many books, including An Elite Family in Early Modern England: The Temples of Stowe and Burton Dassett, 1570-1656. She is currently editing a substantial selection of the Temple Family Papers from the Huntington Library for the Buckinghamshire Record Society. Rosemary lives in Buckinghamshire with two of her three sons.

Dr. Vanessa Wilkie curates Huntington Library’s renowned collections of medieval manuscripts and British History. She earned her Ph.D. in British history from the University of California at Riverside and was visiting assistant professor of history at the University of Redlands before coming to The Huntington in 2013. Her research focuses on aristocratic mother-daughter relationships in early modern England, and she has published on female editorial practices and death rituals. Wilkie has curated two library exhibitions: “Magna Carta: Law & Legend” and “The Reformation: From the Word to the World.” She currently serves on the advisory committee for the arts initiative /five.

Anna McEvoy came to Stowe in 2005, originally as the only member of staff of Stowe House Preservation Trust – we now have a small house opening team and 60 volunteers. I undertake the restoration research, help to manage the restoration projects and building maintenance programme, and manage the archive and collection. Working along side Stowe School and the National Trust Landscape Gardens, Stowe is a dynamic and beautiful place that I never grow tired of.

This Zoom talk will not be recorded.

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George Alexander Gratton: a Spotted Boy in Marlow

Jacqueline Roberts

7-8pm, Thu 25 Nov, 2021

NOW CANCELLED

George Alexander Gratton, also known as the ‘Beautiful Spotted Boy’, was born in St Vincent and the Grenadines in 1808 and suffered from a skin pigmentation condition. An enslaved child, George was taken from his homeland and bought to England where he was cruelly displayed as a ‘live curiosity piece’ throughout the UK until he died at the age of 4 years and 9 months.

In this talk Jacqueline Roberts of SV2G tells us about George’s life, which she discovered as part of a research project run by the High Wycombe-based community group for local St Vincentian diaspora.

Jacque Roberts is CEO of SV2G.

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Soulbury Excavations

Lucy Lawrence and Chris Low,

7-8pm, Wed 10 Nov, 2021

Live talk via Zoom.

Book your free tickets https://bit.ly/3ByfO3D

The town of Soulbury is located within a well preserved medieval landscape, with large swathes of extant ridge and furrow earthworks showing the rural hinterland of the village. The urban area of the surviving village covers a smaller area than it did during the medieval and post medieval periods, as evidenced by numerous surviving earthworks of house platforms and plot boundaries surrounding the village. One such plot of earthworks, located at the southern end of the village, was subject to archaeological investigation during 2019 in advance of a new housing development. The scope and focus of the archaeological works was informed greatly by the cartographic evidence held by the Buckinghamshire Archives, in particular an Estate Map of the village of Soulbury dating to 1769.

Using the Soulbury excavations as a case study, this talk will look at how archaeological assessments draw on historical documents to both inform archaeological investigations, and to aid in the interpretation of the results.

Lucy is part of the Council’s Archaeology team, providing advice and guidance to our planning colleagues on the impacts of development on the archaeological resource. The team also monitor ongoing fieldwork, provide outreach to disseminate exciting new discoveries, and work alongside external partners such as the Chiltern Conservation Board and Discover Bucks Museum to ensure the heritage of the county is looked after.

Chris Low is part of the team at Buckinghamshire Archives.

This talk will not be recorded.

Book your free tickets https://bit.ly/3ByfO3D

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A Temple, a Rotunda, an Arch: New Insights into the Archaeology of Stowe Landscape Gardens

Stephen Wass,

5.45-6.45, Sat 6 Nov, 2021.

Live talk via Zoom.

Book your free tickets https://bit.ly/2YHZMWv

Professional archaeologist Stephen Wass has been working at Stowe to the support the current programme of repair and restoration of the gardens and has examined over a dozen separate locations within the park to clarify a number of important questions about layout and development. In this talk he gives an account of work associated with sites such as the Rotunda, the Doric Arch and statues and most importantly the new discoveries around the site of the Temple of Modern Virtue.

As a freelance archaeologist with thirty years of experience Stephen’s primary research interests are in landscape archaeology especially as applied to historic gardens and parks. He is currently working on a programme of doctoral research with the University of Oxford entitled, ‘Voyages to the House of Diversion: Seventeenth-Century Water Gardens and the Birth of Modern Science’ centred on the little known Jacobean gardens of Hanwell Castle, Oxfordshire. He is also working with the Oxfordshire Gardens Trust to develop a new project entitled ‘Oxfordshire’s Forgotten Gardens’ focussing on other early gardens within the county.

This talk will not be recorded.

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Whitchurch: Researching a Village

Whitchurch

Ian Beckett,

7-8pm Wed 24 Nov 2021

Live via Zoom

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3iP2GQg

The Second World War has entered popular memory as the ‘people’s war’.
Whereas just 1,570 British civilians died as a result of direct enemy action in the First World War, British civilian war dead in the Second World War totalled 66,375.

One constantly recurring wartime theme was of the English countryside as visual shorthand for all that was at risk. On 24 August 1940, H. V. Morton, the journalist and travel writer, encapsulated much of the rural vision in Country Life: ‘It came to me that one of the most remarkable things about this war is the quiet way England has, for many of us, ceased to be a country, or even a county, and has now become a parish.’
It is perhaps appropriate then to look at one particular wartime parish.

The talk will examine the sources available for studying the local history of the Second World War from servicemen and women to the Home Guard, other emergency services, agriculture, fund raising, the impact of national events, and two unique aspects of wartime experience – ‘Winston Churchill’s Toyshop’, and the connection to Mrs Miniver.

Professor Ian Beckett retired as Professor of Military History from the University of Kent in 2015. He has been secretary to the trustees of the Buckinghamshire Military Museum since its inception in 1985, and is also a long-serving member of the Executive Council of the Bucks Record Society. The Society published his edition of the county papers of the 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos in 2016.

Talk will not be recorded

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3iP2GQg

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The Social and Technical History of Sports Wheelchairs: A Beginner’s Guide

Sam Brady,

7-8pm, Thu 18 Nov, 2021.

Live Talk via Zoom

Book your free ticket here: https://bit.ly/2YOCnmw

You might be familiar with history of the Paralympics, but what about the equipment? How did wheelchairs first begin to be used for sport, how have they changed over time, what do these changes mean? Based on my PhD research, this talk explores the technical and socio-political history of sporting wheelchairs, focusing on the athlete-led development of this technology. This establishes how sports innovation became a site of activism and agency for disabled athletes, as new technology allowed for the advancement of these sports. This talk will reflect the current state of my research, and will draw on oral history interviews with wheelchair athletes to bring their unique perspective into this under-researched topic.

Sam Brady is an PhD student at the University of Glasgow and the National Paralympic Heritage Trust. His research, which began in October 2019, explores the social, political and technological history of sporting wheelchairs. Sam’s primary research interests lie in disability history, adaptive sport, and technology, alongside other interests in the historical intersection of disability in marginalised racial or ethnic communities.

You can visit the National Paralympic Heritage Trust’s Website here https://www.paralympicheritage.org.uk

This talk will not be recorded.

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In search of Artists’ Gardens in Buckinghamshire

Claire de Carle,

7.30-8.30 pm, Wed 17 Nov, 2021.

Live talk via Zoom.

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3BBOVf0

During the last four years Buckinghamshire Gardens Trust have been running a small project alongside their more extensive work to record parks and gardens of local historic importance.

The aim of ‘Artists and their Gardens’ was firstly to identify artists that had lived in the historic county and then by researching them establish; were they gardeners, did they create a garden, did they take inspiration from their garden and if their garden survived. We already knew that there were some well known residents which included Paul and John Nash, Eric Gill, and John Piper, but how many others were there? The answer soon became clear, and we compiled a list of over thirty primarily from the 20th century.

Claire de Carle MA is a garden historian, with a keen interest in horticulture, art and social history. She was instrumental in the establishment of the Buckinghamshire Gardens Trust Research & Recording project in 2013 which has produced reports on around 100 locally important historic gardens, her work for the project includes mentoring and training the volunteers. She now advises other county garden trusts on setting up similar projects.
For the last two years she has been the vice chair of the trust and she will shortly take over as chair.

She enjoys writing articles about her research into little known historic landscape gardens and more recently she has set up two other projects: Artists and their Gardens and Public Parks in Buckinghamshire. She also lectures to local groups about Buckinghamshire gardens and Maud Grieve, the herbalist who was the subject of her dissertation.

Talk will not be recorded.

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3BBOVf0

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William Lowndes : How One Man Transformed A Town

David Noy,
7-8pm ,11 Nov 2021.
Live talk via Zoom

William Lowndes left Winslow at the age of 15 when his father went bankrupt and the bailiffs were knocking at the door. He returned to pay his father’s debts, build Winslow Hall and change the town forever. David Noy has mined the documentary record to tell this story of one extraordinary man – and paints a picture of how Winslow’s people, from the well-to-do to the poor, gained and lost from this transformation.

David Noy has lived (on and off) all his life in Winslow, where his great-grandfather Arthur Midgley arrived in 1867. He is an Honorary Research Associate of the Open University (in Classics), Honorary General Editor of the Buckinghamshire Record Society and Honorary Archivist of the Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society. He has published many books and articles on Roman history and on the history of Winslow.

http://www.winslow-history.org.uk/

Talk will not be recorded.

Book your free tickets https://bit.ly/3mJEMHd

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Endell Street: The Trailblazing Women who Ran World War One’s Most Remarkable Military Hospital

Wendy Moore,

7.30-8.30, Thu 4 Nov, 2021.

Live via Zoom

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3BAh8TG

When the First World War broke out in 1914 dozens of women doctors offered their services – but they were told by the British Army to “Go home and sit still”. Flora Murray and Louisa Garrett Anderson refused to sit still. Both qualified doctors and suffragettes – and also life partners – they took a unit of women doctors and nurses to Paris. They ran a hospital there so successfully that the army invited them to open a second hospital in Boulogne and then – in May 1915 – to run a major military hospital in the heart of London.

Wendy Moore is a freelance journalist and author of five books on medical and social history. ENDELL STREET was a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week. It is published in the US as NO MAN’S LAND.

Find out more about Wendy here: https://www.wendymoore.org/

Buy Endell Street here: https://bit.ly/3vX9rVA

This talk will not be recorded.

Book your free tickets here: https://bit.ly/3BAh8TG

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National Treasures: Saving the Nation’s Art in WW2

Caroline Shenton,

7-8pm, Wed 3 Nov 2021.

Live via talk Zoom

On 1 September 1939, the same day that Hitler’s forces marched into Poland, it wasn’t just children who were being evacuated to the countryside. At the height of the late summer heatwave the hour had finally come for the men and women of London’s museums and galleries to roll up their sleeves and save their priceless collections from bombing, invasion or worse. Requisitioning stately homes, Tube tunnels, castles, quarries, prisons and caves as ingenious hiding places, a remarkable bunch of dedicated resisters packed up the nation’s most precious objects and, in a race against time, dispatched them throughout England and Wales on a series of top-secret wartime adventures…including Buckinghamshire. What happened to them next is a remarkable moment from our history when an unlikely coalition of mild-mannered civil servants, social oddballs, and metropolitan aesthetes became nothing less than the heritage front in our fight against the Nazis.

Dr Caroline Shenton is a writer, archivist and historian. She was formerly Director of the Parliamentary Archives in London, and before that was a senior archivist at the National Archives. Her first book The Day Parliament Burned Down won the Political Book of the Year Award in 2013 and its highly-acclaimed sequel, Mr Barry’s War, was a Book of the Year for The Daily Telegraph and BBC History Magazine. In 2017 she was Political Writer in Residence at Gladstone’s Library. Her third book, National Treasures: Saving the Nation’s Art in WWII, will be published on 11 November.

https://www.carolineshenton.co.uk/books/

This live talk will not be recorded.

Book your free tickets https://bit.ly/2YLZDBt